YAMASUKE KurashigeTools

Naniwa Diamond Stones | ナニワ ダイヤモンド角砥石 #400 #600 #800 #1000 #3000 #6000

¥14,900 JPY
· Info
Manufacturer/製造元: NANIWA ・ナニワ
Size&Weight/寸法&重量:  210mm*75mm*36mm 
サイズ:
Quantity:

5 pieces in stock

Customer Reviews

Based on 7 reviews
100%
(7)
0%
(0)
0%
(0)
0%
(0)
0%
(0)
S
Stephan Unger

Naniwa Diamond Stones | ナニワ ダイヤモンド角砥石 #400 #600 #800 #1000 #3000 #6000

P
Pawel Pokiucinski

Naniwa Diamond Stones | ナニワ ダイヤモンド角砥石 #400 #600 #800 #1000 #3000 #6000

M
M.M.

Fast processing, communication, and shipping from Kurashige. Would do business again.

Regarding the sharpening stones.

In short I would recommend this sharpening stone series for swords and maybe axes. The finish after the 6000 cuts exceptionally well.

The manufacturing quality is good. The surface is flat. Corners and edges are round. Packaging is clean. Resurfacing stone works, somewhat slowly.

The 6000 finish is slightly finer than the chocera 5000. The chocera 5000 finishes roughly the same as a kyoto honyama at 2.5 micron particle size. 5000 JIS R 6001 is roughly 2.5 micron, so the 6000 would be 6000 JIS R 6001 at 2 micron. Meaning the series uses the JIS R 6001 abrasive standard for grit designation. Very nice.

The binder of the 400, 600, 800, and 1000 feels close to the chocera in texture, adherence, and compression. The binder of the 3000 and 6000 is higly compressed and dense. The chocera supposedly uses a magnesium based cement binder, so this stone series probably uses a similar magnesium based cement binder.

The finished physical cut of each stone follows the abrasive material particle size. The blade finished at 6000 physically cuts at 2 micron, and so on.

The feel of the finished cut follows the compression or density of the binder. The feel of the cut finished at 1000 feels like a 1200, and so on for 400, 600, and 800. The feel of the cut finished at 6000 feels like a 600,000 to 1,200,000 due to compression or density of the binder.

The look and taste of the cut typically follows the binder material. The binder that allows for compression unfortunately is sticky cement. I find stones using magnesium based cement binders to look ok and taste like cement, but this stone series adds some extra adhesion to the cement formula for the compression capabilities. The added adhesiveness makes the cut look bad, as in ugly, and the binder taste bad, not simply tasting like cement. I can’t say whether the binder sticks to the abraded surface and ends up cutting your medium instead of the abraded surface, or the surface abraded from the binder takes on the qualities of the binder. It does not seem like something that can be saved by stropping or further sharpening at around 1 micron.

So this stone cuts exceptionally well, but the cut tastes bad and looks ugly.

I used this stone for food, so the bad taste and ugly look of the cut does not fit my purposes.

Perhaps this stone fits for non finishing work on wood. Finishing work on wood would have look issues.

Therefore use where the cut is everything and taste and look do not matter would be swords and maybe axes. The chocera 10,000 advertises swords, so perhaps the manufacturer is aware of its purposes.

I
Isaac Love
Quite flat and ready to go

A little touch up on a plate of glass with some 220 grit took these stones to uniform. I look forward to years of service from them. One must flatten the backs of their cutting edges to truly work sharp.

F
Fernando Castillo
Works like a charm

This is the first professional diamond stone that I own and have to say that makes the flattening and/or sharpening process so more simple, compared to other methods.
Thanks for the recommendation.

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Customer Reviews

Based on 7 reviews
100%
(7)
0%
(0)
0%
(0)
0%
(0)
0%
(0)
S
Stephan Unger

Naniwa Diamond Stones | ナニワ ダイヤモンド角砥石 #400 #600 #800 #1000 #3000 #6000

P
Pawel Pokiucinski

Naniwa Diamond Stones | ナニワ ダイヤモンド角砥石 #400 #600 #800 #1000 #3000 #6000

M
M.M.

Fast processing, communication, and shipping from Kurashige. Would do business again.

Regarding the sharpening stones.

In short I would recommend this sharpening stone series for swords and maybe axes. The finish after the 6000 cuts exceptionally well.

The manufacturing quality is good. The surface is flat. Corners and edges are round. Packaging is clean. Resurfacing stone works, somewhat slowly.

The 6000 finish is slightly finer than the chocera 5000. The chocera 5000 finishes roughly the same as a kyoto honyama at 2.5 micron particle size. 5000 JIS R 6001 is roughly 2.5 micron, so the 6000 would be 6000 JIS R 6001 at 2 micron. Meaning the series uses the JIS R 6001 abrasive standard for grit designation. Very nice.

The binder of the 400, 600, 800, and 1000 feels close to the chocera in texture, adherence, and compression. The binder of the 3000 and 6000 is higly compressed and dense. The chocera supposedly uses a magnesium based cement binder, so this stone series probably uses a similar magnesium based cement binder.

The finished physical cut of each stone follows the abrasive material particle size. The blade finished at 6000 physically cuts at 2 micron, and so on.

The feel of the finished cut follows the compression or density of the binder. The feel of the cut finished at 1000 feels like a 1200, and so on for 400, 600, and 800. The feel of the cut finished at 6000 feels like a 600,000 to 1,200,000 due to compression or density of the binder.

The look and taste of the cut typically follows the binder material. The binder that allows for compression unfortunately is sticky cement. I find stones using magnesium based cement binders to look ok and taste like cement, but this stone series adds some extra adhesion to the cement formula for the compression capabilities. The added adhesiveness makes the cut look bad, as in ugly, and the binder taste bad, not simply tasting like cement. I can’t say whether the binder sticks to the abraded surface and ends up cutting your medium instead of the abraded surface, or the surface abraded from the binder takes on the qualities of the binder. It does not seem like something that can be saved by stropping or further sharpening at around 1 micron.

So this stone cuts exceptionally well, but the cut tastes bad and looks ugly.

I used this stone for food, so the bad taste and ugly look of the cut does not fit my purposes.

Perhaps this stone fits for non finishing work on wood. Finishing work on wood would have look issues.

Therefore use where the cut is everything and taste and look do not matter would be swords and maybe axes. The chocera 10,000 advertises swords, so perhaps the manufacturer is aware of its purposes.

I
Isaac Love
Quite flat and ready to go

A little touch up on a plate of glass with some 220 grit took these stones to uniform. I look forward to years of service from them. One must flatten the backs of their cutting edges to truly work sharp.

F
Fernando Castillo
Works like a charm

This is the first professional diamond stone that I own and have to say that makes the flattening and/or sharpening process so more simple, compared to other methods.
Thanks for the recommendation.

Customer Reviews

Based on 7 reviews
100%
(7)
0%
(0)
0%
(0)
0%
(0)
0%
(0)
S
Stephan Unger

Naniwa Diamond Stones | ナニワ ダイヤモンド角砥石 #400 #600 #800 #1000 #3000 #6000

P
Pawel Pokiucinski

Naniwa Diamond Stones | ナニワ ダイヤモンド角砥石 #400 #600 #800 #1000 #3000 #6000

M
M.M.

Fast processing, communication, and shipping from Kurashige. Would do business again.

Regarding the sharpening stones.

In short I would recommend this sharpening stone series for swords and maybe axes. The finish after the 6000 cuts exceptionally well.

The manufacturing quality is good. The surface is flat. Corners and edges are round. Packaging is clean. Resurfacing stone works, somewhat slowly.

The 6000 finish is slightly finer than the chocera 5000. The chocera 5000 finishes roughly the same as a kyoto honyama at 2.5 micron particle size. 5000 JIS R 6001 is roughly 2.5 micron, so the 6000 would be 6000 JIS R 6001 at 2 micron. Meaning the series uses the JIS R 6001 abrasive standard for grit designation. Very nice.

The binder of the 400, 600, 800, and 1000 feels close to the chocera in texture, adherence, and compression. The binder of the 3000 and 6000 is higly compressed and dense. The chocera supposedly uses a magnesium based cement binder, so this stone series probably uses a similar magnesium based cement binder.

The finished physical cut of each stone follows the abrasive material particle size. The blade finished at 6000 physically cuts at 2 micron, and so on.

The feel of the finished cut follows the compression or density of the binder. The feel of the cut finished at 1000 feels like a 1200, and so on for 400, 600, and 800. The feel of the cut finished at 6000 feels like a 600,000 to 1,200,000 due to compression or density of the binder.

The look and taste of the cut typically follows the binder material. The binder that allows for compression unfortunately is sticky cement. I find stones using magnesium based cement binders to look ok and taste like cement, but this stone series adds some extra adhesion to the cement formula for the compression capabilities. The added adhesiveness makes the cut look bad, as in ugly, and the binder taste bad, not simply tasting like cement. I can’t say whether the binder sticks to the abraded surface and ends up cutting your medium instead of the abraded surface, or the surface abraded from the binder takes on the qualities of the binder. It does not seem like something that can be saved by stropping or further sharpening at around 1 micron.

So this stone cuts exceptionally well, but the cut tastes bad and looks ugly.

I used this stone for food, so the bad taste and ugly look of the cut does not fit my purposes.

Perhaps this stone fits for non finishing work on wood. Finishing work on wood would have look issues.

Therefore use where the cut is everything and taste and look do not matter would be swords and maybe axes. The chocera 10,000 advertises swords, so perhaps the manufacturer is aware of its purposes.

I
Isaac Love
Quite flat and ready to go

A little touch up on a plate of glass with some 220 grit took these stones to uniform. I look forward to years of service from them. One must flatten the backs of their cutting edges to truly work sharp.

F
Fernando Castillo
Works like a charm

This is the first professional diamond stone that I own and have to say that makes the flattening and/or sharpening process so more simple, compared to other methods.
Thanks for the recommendation.

Customer Reviews

Based on 7 reviews
100%
(7)
0%
(0)
0%
(0)
0%
(0)
0%
(0)
S
Stephan Unger

Naniwa Diamond Stones | ナニワ ダイヤモンド角砥石 #400 #600 #800 #1000 #3000 #6000

P
Pawel Pokiucinski

Naniwa Diamond Stones | ナニワ ダイヤモンド角砥石 #400 #600 #800 #1000 #3000 #6000

M
M.M.

Fast processing, communication, and shipping from Kurashige. Would do business again.

Regarding the sharpening stones.

In short I would recommend this sharpening stone series for swords and maybe axes. The finish after the 6000 cuts exceptionally well.

The manufacturing quality is good. The surface is flat. Corners and edges are round. Packaging is clean. Resurfacing stone works, somewhat slowly.

The 6000 finish is slightly finer than the chocera 5000. The chocera 5000 finishes roughly the same as a kyoto honyama at 2.5 micron particle size. 5000 JIS R 6001 is roughly 2.5 micron, so the 6000 would be 6000 JIS R 6001 at 2 micron. Meaning the series uses the JIS R 6001 abrasive standard for grit designation. Very nice.

The binder of the 400, 600, 800, and 1000 feels close to the chocera in texture, adherence, and compression. The binder of the 3000 and 6000 is higly compressed and dense. The chocera supposedly uses a magnesium based cement binder, so this stone series probably uses a similar magnesium based cement binder.

The finished physical cut of each stone follows the abrasive material particle size. The blade finished at 6000 physically cuts at 2 micron, and so on.

The feel of the finished cut follows the compression or density of the binder. The feel of the cut finished at 1000 feels like a 1200, and so on for 400, 600, and 800. The feel of the cut finished at 6000 feels like a 600,000 to 1,200,000 due to compression or density of the binder.

The look and taste of the cut typically follows the binder material. The binder that allows for compression unfortunately is sticky cement. I find stones using magnesium based cement binders to look ok and taste like cement, but this stone series adds some extra adhesion to the cement formula for the compression capabilities. The added adhesiveness makes the cut look bad, as in ugly, and the binder taste bad, not simply tasting like cement. I can’t say whether the binder sticks to the abraded surface and ends up cutting your medium instead of the abraded surface, or the surface abraded from the binder takes on the qualities of the binder. It does not seem like something that can be saved by stropping or further sharpening at around 1 micron.

So this stone cuts exceptionally well, but the cut tastes bad and looks ugly.

I used this stone for food, so the bad taste and ugly look of the cut does not fit my purposes.

Perhaps this stone fits for non finishing work on wood. Finishing work on wood would have look issues.

Therefore use where the cut is everything and taste and look do not matter would be swords and maybe axes. The chocera 10,000 advertises swords, so perhaps the manufacturer is aware of its purposes.

I
Isaac Love
Quite flat and ready to go

A little touch up on a plate of glass with some 220 grit took these stones to uniform. I look forward to years of service from them. One must flatten the backs of their cutting edges to truly work sharp.

F
Fernando Castillo
Works like a charm

This is the first professional diamond stone that I own and have to say that makes the flattening and/or sharpening process so more simple, compared to other methods.
Thanks for the recommendation.